Prepare for the Riesling Invasion of Portland, Oregon!

RIemailGet ready, Portland Riesling lovers, because the Invasion is coming!

On Saturday, July 19th, 39 wineries will converge on the Olympic Mills Building and pour — are you ready for this — 100 different Rieslings!

And if tasting 100 Rieslings isn’t enough for you, how about …

Rock Out with Vin Halen

Enjoy live music from the all winemaker band “Vin Halen,” with our very own Jay Somers (guitar) and Tim Malone (bass) from J. Christopher Wines in Newberg, plus Tyson Crowley (Crowley Wines) on drums.

Grab a Bite to Go with Your Glass

Riesling is the perfect wine to pair with food, and you’ll have plenty of choices to test your taste buds:

Get Your Book, Then Get it Signed

International Riesling expert Stuart Pigott will be on hand to sell and sign his brand-new, hot-off-the-presses book: “Best White Wine on Earth: The Riesling Story.”

SWAG(GER) AROUND

The folks from Summer of Riesling (sponsored by Ambonnay Champagne Bar) will be there with plenty of swag!

WHAT WE’LL BE POURING

And, of course, in case you’re wondering, we’ll be there in force, pouring a selection of Old World Rieslings from the Loosen Bros. USA portfolio. Click on each wine to learn more.

 

How You Can Join the Riesling Invasion

Saturday, July 19th
4 to 8 pm
Olympic Mills Building
107 SE Washington Street, Portland, Oregon

Tickets are $30 in advance at rieslinginvasion.com or $35 at the door.
Important Note: Attendees must be 21+ years old.

Help us spread word of the invasion! Follow the event on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram: @RieslingInvader and #RieslingInvasion.

One Response to “Prepare for the Riesling Invasion of Portland, Oregon!”

  1. Ahmed

    Haha I remember hinvag a Riesling like this once. I got the first glass, and I said Hmm, smells a bit like petroleum, which led to looks of disgust. It’s actually similar to the reactions I get when I say I detect tobacco in a red, but this one was met with a lot more disbelief.Anyways, moral of the almost entirely tangential story is that petrol done right is a fantastic quality in wine. I’m surprised you got those notes so early in the wine’s life. Doesn’t that kind of quality usually come to the forefront in more mature wines?